Armchair gardening: dreaming, scheming, and buying

Never mind the rather unfortunate green shade on our newly painted house–nothing to do about it, so I’ll just make the garden so beautiful that no one notices the house siding. Below is the kitchen garden, after Sam and I took everything out, except the one hosta whose roots appear to be sunk to China.

kitchen garden July 21, 2012
kitchen garden July 21, 2012

Here is the same garden before we tackled it:

Kitchen garden before dismantling
Kitchen garden before dismantling

Besides taking everything out, we also completely removed the lower tier and the lower short rock wall. Let me show a photo from a few years ago of this garden newly made (you can see why we had to paint the house!):

2007 newly built and planted and mulched
2007 newly built and planted and mulched
The same garden in 2009
The same garden in 2009

Here it is in early May, 2010, after I added the second tier of rocks:

May 1, 2010
May 1, 2010

But it doesn’t stay this neat. It almost always looked like this picture taken in 2012:

June 2012 kitchen garden jumble
June 2012 kitchen garden jumble

So, now that it’s emptied out, Here’s my plan.

  • stop trying to get rid of the bishop’s weed (Aegopodium podagraria “variegatum”) that’s all through there and can’t be eradicated anyway.
  • stop trying to get rid of the stinging nettles that came along with the barnyard dirt we used to fill the new bed at the start.
  • buy some nice GREEN and WHITE plants, including patriot hosta; a small white hydrangea; variegated Solomon’s Seal (I already bought these from White Flower Farm).
  • Add in from plants I already have: sweet woodruff, sweet cicely, snowdrops, white bleeding heart, other hostas, tiarellia, and others I’m not remembering right now.

The idea: an all green and white garden. Should be spectacular! I plan to keep cutting the stinging nettles for the soup pot as they grow.

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Hi Michele! Stinging nettles are full of vitamin C, and other healthy stuff that other dark green leafy things have. I tried them out and they taste good, too. You pick the leaves off a younginsh plant, with gloves of course, and boil them for a few minutes, then just eat them like spinach or in soup. The other plant I have lots of, dandilion, I’m also going to try to eat a lot of this year. You can eat the young leaves just like lettuce, no cooking. Bring on the weeds!

  2. Michele Whalen says:

    Anne, the siding looks very nice in my opinion. How come I don’t know that you can eat nettles? Or am I misreading something? The kitchen garden will look just beautiful all green and white. I can’t wait to see it next summer. Be well my Friend.

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